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USF & Temple Terrace

The University of South Florida, also known as USF, is a member institution of the State University System of Florida and a public research university located in Tampa, Florida, USA. Founded in 1956, USF is the fourth-largest public university in the state of Florida, with a total enrollment of 47,646 as of the 2012–2013 academic years. The USF system comprises three institutions: USF Tampa, USF St. Petersburg and USF Sarasota-Manatee. Each institution is separately accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The university is home to 14 colleges, offering over 80 undergraduate majors and more than 130 graduate, specialist, and doctoral-level degree programs.

USF is classified by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in the top tier of research universities, and is one of only four universities in Florida to hold this highest level of classification. In its 2011 ranking, the Intellectual Property Owners Association placed USF 10th among all universities worldwide in the number of US patents granted. The university has an annual budget of $1.5 billion and an annual economic impact of $3.7 billion. In a ranking compiled by the National Science Foundation, USF has the 50th-highest research expenditure in the United States and in the state of Florida only trails the University of Florida.

USF ranks in the top 100 best public schools in the 2012 Best Colleges edition of U.S. News & World Report. In 2012, the university was also ranked eighth among "up and coming" universities by U.S. News & World Report. USF was named a national leader in online education by Guide to Online Schools. USF graduate level programs – including Public Health, Library and Information Studies, Education, and Criminology – continue to rank among the nation's 50 best in the U.S. News & World Report graduate school rankings

USF was the first independent state university conceived, planned, and built during the 20th century. Former U.S. Representative Sam Gibbons was instrumental in the school's creation when he was a state representative and is considered by many to be the "Father of USF." Though founded in 1956, the university was not officially named until the following year, and courses did not begin until 1960. The university was built off Fowler Avenue on the site of Henderson Air Field, a World War II airstrip. In 1957, the Florida Cabinet approved the name "University of South Florida." At the time, USF was the southernmost university in the state university system. In 1962, the official USF mascot was unveiled as the "Golden Brahman." In the late 1980s, the mascot evolved into the "Bulls

 

Temple Terrace

Temple Terrace is the third and smallest incorporated municipality in Hillsborough County. (Tampa and Plant City are the others.) Incorporated in 1925, the community is known for its rolling landscape, bucolic Hillsborough River views, and majestic trees; it has the most grand sand live oak trees of any place in central Florida and is a Tree City USA. Temple Terrace was originally planned as a 1920s Mediterranean-Revival golf-course community and is one of the first such communities in the United States (planned in 1920)

The city was named for the then-new hybrid, the Temple orange. The Temple orange, which is also called the tangor, is a cross between the mandarin orange also called the tangerine and the common sweet orange; it was named after Florida-born William Chase Temple, one-time owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates and founder of the Temple Cup. Chase was also the first president of the Florida Citrus Exchange. Temple Terrace was the first place in the United States where the new Temple orange was grown in large quantities. The "terrace" portion of the name refers to the terraced terrain of the area by the river where the city was founded. One of the original houses also had a terraced yard with a lawn sloping, in tiers, toward the river.

The original inhabitants of the Temple Terrace area were known as the Tocobaga, a group of Native Americans living around Tampa Bay, both in prehistoric and historic times, until roughly 1760. Their numbers declined in the seventeenth century, due, at least in part, to diseases brought to the New World by the Europeans, to which they had little natural resistance. All of the Florida tribes were also severely affected by the raids of Creeks and Yamasee during the late stages of the seventeenth century. In any case, the Tocobaga disappeared from history less than a hundred years later.

Spanish exploration of the Temple Terrace area dates back to 1757 when explorer Don Francisco Maria Celi of the Spanish Royal Fleet made his way up the Hillsborough River (naming it "El Rio de San Julian y Arriaga") to what is now Riverhills Park in search of pine trees to use as masts for his ships. Here, in the extensive longleaf pine forest, he erected a cross in what he named "El Pinal de la Cruz de Santa Teresa" (the Pine Forest of the Cross of Saint Theresa). Confirmation of the fleet's travels is found in its map and log book. A historic marker and a replica of the cross erected to honor St. Theresa is found in Riverhills Park today. Up to 1913, the longleaf pine, sand live oak, and cypress trees made the area suitable for turpentine manufacturing and logging.

The area now known as Temple Terrace was originally part of an exclusive 19,000-acre (77 km2) game preserve called "Riverhills" belonging to Chicago socialite Bertha Palmer (also known as Mrs. Potter Palmer). (She played an extensive role in making Sarasota, Florida the "City of the Arts" that it is today. She was one of the largest landholders, ranchers, farmers, and developers in Florida at the turn of the twentieth century.) The Evening Independent newspaper in 1918 described the preserve as "a well stocked hunting preserve north of Tampa being one of the most attractive hunting grounds in the state.” Property acquisition by the Palmers and the Honorés began in 1910; only one of the original buildings from the preserve, now known as the Woodmont Clubhouse, remains. Because it escaped logging, the grounds of the clubhouse harbor some of the largest specimens of live oak and longleaf pine in the city.

 

USF & Temple Terrace

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Neighborhoods:

  • Ashford Green
  • Bavarian Village
  • Biltmore Park
  • Bridgeford Oaks
  • Frances Arbor
  • Bonnie Brae
  • Grand Circle
  • Meadowood
  • Meadowood Oaks
  • Oak Bridge
  • Pleasant Terrace
  • Raintree Manor
  • Raintree Oaks
  • Raintree Terrace
  • Raintree Village
  • River Forest
  • River Landing
  • River Manor
  • River Run
  • Rolling Terrace
  • Rustic Village
  • Silver Oaks
  • Terrace Oaks
  • Theresa Arbor
  • Victoria Terrace
  • Whiteway Terrace Villas

 

 

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